Latest uploads:

 

2017-02-20: Bradley: VC

2017-02-04: McKimm: VC

2017-01-21: von Reuter: VC2

2017-01-10: Köhler: Romance

2016-12-18: Sachse: VC

2016-12-08: Felsenfeld: VC

2016-11-26: Langheinrich: VC

2016-11-24: Göhler: VC2

...

small works

On this site I present scores of compositions that are hard to impossible to find and which are just short pieces, not a whole violin concerto. For all these compositions I just own a copy of the published score, not the original handwritten manuscript. I nevertheless decided to present these works here for the reason of preservation and support.

Alphonse Pirson

It is little known about the Belgian composer Alphonse Pirson. I had never heard of him before when I stumbled across a small published score of his "Evocante caresse, for cello or violin and orchestra". I bought the score and tried to find more about him. He is not listed in the common encyclopedias, and from the sheet music I could just find information that it was printed in "Bressoux-Liege". So I contacted the Music Conservatory of Liege and they at least could tell me Alphonse Pirson was a student there in the 1920s and that he was born in 1893.

 

Please have in mind that the printed score is for cello and piano, so the sound below is a computer realisation also for cello and piano.

Pirson_EvocanteCaresse.pdf
PDF-Dokument [1.5 MB]

Georges Piccoli

The French composer and violinist Georges Piccoli was born around the year 1885. I could not find an exact year, but Georges Piccoli is listed as a student at the Schola Cantorum in Paris for the year 1906 to 1910. He studies there music theory, counterpoint, chamber music and violin.

I could not find information about the life and work of Georges Piccoli after his study years, but he is today still recognised for his book "Trois siècles de l'histoire du violon" which he published in 1954.

 

The score for his Poeme was published privately by the composer most likely around 1930. The publishing information says he lived in 138, rue Houdan in Sceaux at that time.

 

The sound snippet below is a computer realisation of a middle part of the Poeme.

Piccoli_Poeme.pdf
PDF-Dokument [5.6 MB]

Maurits Samehtini

The Dutch composer Maurits Samehtini was born 09.12.1863 into a musical family with a father who taught violin at the Den Haag Music School. Maurits Samehtini played violin at the age of 6 and started to play the horn at the age of 12. He studied horn and later became hornist in different Dutch orchestras. Beside his work as a hornist and later conductor, he also composed dozens of smaller compositions. Maurits Samehtini died 02.04.1943.

 

The sound snippet below is a computer realisation of the beginning of the Romance.

Samehtini_Romance.pdf
PDF-Dokument [2.4 MB]

George Henschel

George Henschel was born 18.02.1850 in Breslau and received at first piano lessons before starting singing and becoming a baritone. In 1874 he met Johannes Brahms and from that time he was a close friend to the famous composer. After his studies he started a successful singing career, but he also was a distinguished piano accompanist and conductor. In 1881 George Henschel became the first conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He also composed a lot of instrumental works and was finally knighted in 1914. George Henschel died 10.09.1934 in Aviemore.

 

The sound snippet below is a computer realisation from the middle of the Elegy.

Henschel_Elegy.pdf
PDF-Dokument [1.3 MB]

Abraham Lazansky

Abraham "Abe" Lazansky was born in 1915 in Freehold (New Jersey, USA). He went to Freehold High School and was some kind of a local violinist child prodigy. He later studied at the Juilliard School of Music and became the first violinist of the New York Ballet Theatre Orchestra. During World War II Abe Lazansky served as an X-ray technician at the 131th Infantry at Fort Brady and in the last days was a member of the Infantry Concert Group, a 22-strong ensemble with conductor Richard Freitas and violin soloist Alvin Rudnitsky that toured through the US in 1945. In 1942 he married pianist Helen Crenshaw and he was also the founder of the "Luzanne Trio". There is no information when Abraham Lazansky has died.

 

The sound snippet below is a computer realisation of the beginning of the Concertino.

Lazansky_Concertino.pdf
PDF-Dokument [326.4 KB]

Mario van Overeem

Marie-Lambert van Overeem was born on 26 May 1872 in Leiden (Netherlands). He later was professor at the Brussels Conservatory. Further biographical information is missing. He died in 1946.

 

The sound snippet below is a computer realisation of the beginning of the Fantasie.

Overeem_Fantasie.pdf
PDF-Dokument [407.5 KB]

August Emanuel Gerspacher

August Emanuel Gerspacher was born 28 July 1858 in Rußwihl, a small town near Waldshut (Germany). He studied with Engelbert Humperdinck and later worked as a music teacher in Karlsruhe. He died on 6 March 1930 in Karlsruhe.

From the Violin concerto by Gerspacher only one movement - the "Poco lento" - survived in piano reduction. The published score mentions orchestral parts, but the archive of the Meistersingerverlag does not exist anymore. I have no information if Gerspacher ever composed other movements of the violin concerto and I don't know where the manuscripts of him are archived nowadays.

 

The sound snippet below is a computer realisation of the beginning of the Poco lento.

Gerspacher_ViolinConcerto.pdf
PDF-Dokument [2.3 MB]

Milan Lusk

Milan Lusk was born 1893 in Illinois (USA). His father was a lawyer and his mother, Marie Koupal-Lusk, a famous painter. Milan Lusk received his first lessons in Chicago under Joseph H. Capek. He later went to Pisek (Bohemia) to study with Otakar Sevcik. After his studies he toured as a violin soloist worldwide and performed in the presence of royalties like Queen Marie of Romania, Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini or the Czecho-Slovakian president Tomas Masaryk. He made a few recordings that still exist. Milan Lusk died during a tour on 8 September 1932 in Prague of heart disease after an operation for a gastric ailment.

 

The "Dream song (Idylle)" should also exist in an orchestral version, but I have no information if it still exists.

 

The snippet below is a computer realisation of the beginning of the Dream Song.

Lusk_DreamSong.pdf
PDF-Dokument [2.6 MB]

Oscar Köhler

Oscar Köhler was born on 19 May 1851 (other sources say 18 May, or 1857) in Schkeuditz (Germany). He studied with Joseph Brambach and Julius Tausch in Bonn. Later Oscar Köhler worked as a lecturer at the Sternsches Konservatorium in Berlin and as conductor. In his late years he was music director of the Stadtorchester and the Winderstein Orchester in Leipzig. Oscar Köhler died on 9 December 1917 in Erfurt.

 

The "Romance for violin and orchestra op.136" was composed around 1900 and published by Richard Kaun in Berlin.

Kohler_Romance.pdf
PDF-Dokument [2.4 MB]

The snippet below is a computer realisation of the beginning of the Romance.

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